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The CSI effect: fact or fiction?

Posted by on Jul 3, 2015 in Blog Posts | 3 comments

Fascinated with forensics A long line of television shows, from the venerable Dragnet to the current crop of police procedurals, has piqued the public’s interest in criminal evidence and forensic science. What does this public fascination with crime shows featuring forensics mean for the real-life prosecution of a criminal case? One researcher suggests that “television is our principal source of popular legal culture” and crime dramas “take root in our psyches” where they “help construct our understandings of law and justice.” The popularity of shows like CSI, Cold Case and Law & Order has certainly raised concerns within the criminal justice system that a phenomenon called the “CSI effect,” influences jurors decisions causing them to “wrongfully acquit guilty defendants when no scientific evidence has been presented.” According to supporters of the CSI effect, popular television programs and reality shows about...

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The CSI effect: fact or fiction?

Posted by on Jul 3, 2015 in Blog Posts | 3 comments

Fascinated with forensics A long line of television shows, from the venerable Dragnet to the current crop of police procedurals, has piqued the public’s interest in criminal evidence and forensic science. What does this public fascination with crime shows featuring forensics mean for the real-life prosecution of a criminal case? One researcher suggests that “television is our principal source of popular legal culture” and crime dramas “take root in our psyches” where they “help construct our understandings of law and justice.” The popularity of shows like CSI, Cold Case and Law & Order has certainly raised concerns within the criminal justice system that a phenomenon called the “CSI effect,” influences jurors decisions causing them to “wrongfully acquit guilty defendants when no scientific evidence has been presented.” According to supporters of the CSI effect, popular television programs and reality shows about...

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The CSI effect: fact or fiction?

Posted by on Jul 3, 2015 in Blog Posts | 6 comments

Fascinated with forensics A long line of television shows, from the venerable Dragnet to the current crop of police procedurals, has piqued the public’s interest in criminal evidence and forensic science. What does this public fascination with crime shows featuring forensics mean for the real-life prosecution of a criminal case? One researcher suggests that “television is our principal source of popular legal culture” and crime dramas “take root in our psyches” where they “help construct our understandings of law and justice.” The popularity of shows like CSI, Cold Case and Law & Order has certainly raised concerns within the criminal justice system that a phenomenon called the “CSI effect,” influences jurors decisions causing them to “wrongfully acquit guilty defendants when no scientific evidence has been presented.” According to supporters of the CSI effect, popular television programs and reality shows about...

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Do Gambel’s Quail Experience Grief?

Posted by on Jul 1, 2015 in Blog Posts | 1 comment

Read this post, then take a survey! http://bit.ly/mysciblogreaders Prizes! More details at the end of this post. Morning and evening, our yard is full of Gambel’s quail, known in scientific circles as Callipepla gambelii. We keep our bird feeders full, luring the ubiquitous house finch, sparrows of several species, the gray and red Pyrrhuloxia and our favorite, the Northern cardinal, Cardinalis cardinalis. As the perching birds quarrel over the best seats on the feeder, seed often spills to the ground, drawing the ground-feeding quail. In the spring, quail parents escort their young to the feeders, showing them how to scratch and peck for spilled seeds. We see the same families visit the feeders day after day. The young quail, soon sprouting their topknots and becoming gangly adolescents, seem to learn the route to the feeders with ease. It’s easy...

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