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The legacy of flawed forensics: bad science and ruined lives

Posted by on May 4, 2015 in Blog Posts | 2 comments

Over the past decade, a groundswell of criticism has erupted concerning forensic science, a field once held in high regard, at least in the popular imagination. Forensic science, a discipline “relating to or dealing with the application of scientific knowledge to legal problems,” is under siege on many fronts. One of those fronts relates to the admission of microscopic hair comparison evidence to connect an individual accused of a crime with a particular crime scene. A Stunning Admission On April 20, 2015, the United States Department of Justice (DOJ), the Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI), the Innocence Project and the National Association of Criminal Defense Lawyers (NACDL) released a joint press statement announcing that 26 of 28 examiners in the FBI Laboratory’s microscopic hair comparison unit overstated hair matches in more than 90 percent of the 268 trials reviewed, wrongfully placing...

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The legacy of flawed forensics: bad science and ruined lives

Posted by on May 4, 2015 in Blog Posts | 4 comments

Over the past decade, a groundswell of criticism has erupted concerning forensic science, a field once held in high regard, at least in the popular imagination. Forensic science, a discipline “relating to or dealing with the application of scientific knowledge to legal problems,” is under siege on many fronts. One of those fronts relates to the admission of microscopic hair comparison evidence to connect an individual accused of a crime with a particular crime scene. A Stunning Admission On April 20, 2015, the United States Department of Justice (DOJ), the Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI), the Innocence Project and the National Association of Criminal Defense Lawyers (NACDL) released a joint press statement announcing that 26 of 28 examiners in the FBI Laboratory’s microscopic hair comparison unit overstated hair matches in more than 90 percent of the 268 trials reviewed, wrongfully placing...

Read More